Month: December 2015

The RizalTech wins the 28th SCUAA-NCR season for her 11th consecutive over-all championship

Posted on December 14, 2015

In the fulfilment of our mission to continue serving the nation through the development of responsible, capable and productive citizens in general, and in contributing to the sports development of the country, we have once again won the over-all championship in the SCUAA-NCR.

For the 11th consecutive season the RizalTech wins the over-all championship of the SCUAA-NCR with 148 gold medals, 90 silvers and 41 bronze medals.

Far second is the Polytechnic University of the Philippines which garnered 85 gold, 81 silver and 39 bronze medals.

Third over-all is the Technological University of the Philippines which won 17 gold, 13 silver and 41 bronze medals.

Fourth is the Philippine Normal University which won 7 gold, 11 silver and 56 bronze medals.

Philsca won 1 gold medal, 13 silvers and 39 bronze medals.

Both EARIST and MPC did not win any gold medals.

Our athletes are always reminded that they should study hard.  They should play and practice hard but they should aim for the ultimate gold medal which is their college degree.  We remind them that no matter how many gold medals they win if they cannot finish their studies, those medals would just be pieces of junk metal.  Thus, our athletes really graduate.

Categories: President's Corner

December 1, 2015

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT CENTER

STAFFING AND CLASSIFICATION DIVISION

List of Vacant positions in compliance with RA 7041

Vacant Position Item Numbers Qualification
*(1) Administrative Aide III (SG-13) Casual Completion of two year studies in college w/ Career Service (Sub-Professional)/ First level Eligibility

* Renewal

Categories: Careers

NOVEMBER 23, 2015 TO DECEMBER 3, 2015

NAME COURSE REQUEST REMARKS
11/23/2015 1 ABAR, JONALYN MGMT TOR GRADUATE
CBET 2 CALDERON, ROBELLE MGMT TOR GRADUATE
3 KIMBONGAN, BERNADETTE MGMT TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
4 PARREÑO, ALEXIS MKTG. MGMT. CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIP
5 SANTOS, VINCENT MGMT TOR GRADUATE
11/24/2015
CAS/CED 1 AGUSTIN, ANGIE CED TOR COPY FOR RTU GRAD SCHOOL
 /IPE/GS 2 BELTRAN, VICTORIA GS TOR FOR REFERENCE
 /CON 3 CABREZA, KRISTINE CAS TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT/ NOF137
4 CENTENO, KATHRYN CAS TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
5 CORDOVA, NIKKI BSPE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
6 DELA CRUZ, PAMELA ANN CED HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO PAYMENT
7 DIAZ, MARY CHARMENTE CAS HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
8 GEPANA, KEVIN JOHN CAS TCG FOR SCHOLARSHIP/ NO F137
9 GONZALES, EDCEL CAS HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
10 IBAYAN, MYRNA GS TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT/ NO OTR COPY FOR RTU
11 LADREGA, GLADYS CED TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT
12 MAPULA, CELICA AMOR CAS TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT/ NO F137
13 MONO, MARY PRINCESS BSN TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
14 NAYRA, MIRIAM ROSE CAS CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIP
15 NERI, CINDY CED HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
16 NERONA, EMILY CED HD/TCG FOR FURTHER STUDY
17 PAILONA, ROWELL BSPE TOR GRADUATE
18 PATAGNAN, ELIZABETH GS TOR FOR EVALUATION
19 PEREZ, SARRAH JANE BSPE TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
20 TORIDA, MARY LYN CAS TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
21 VALDEZ, ARVELYN CED TOR FOR BOARD EXAMIANTION/ NO F137
22 VALDEZ, EDGAR JOHAN BSPE TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ NO F137
23 VILI, KATHERINE CAS TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
24 YAP, LOVELY CAS HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
11/27/2015
CEIT 1 AGAM, KHARYNE ANGEL ARCHI TOR
2 AGUINALDO, IVY CET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
3 AGUSTIN, ARMIE ECE TOR
4 BANDAL, ZARAH ROSE ECE TOR TO PAY EXCESS PAGE
5 BARBOSA, ORLANDO CPET TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ NO ENTRUSTMENT LETTER
6 BERMUDEZ, BRENDA JOYCE ICT TOR
7 BOQUE, JOGIE ECE COG
8 BUENAVISTA, GIAN CARLO EE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO TOR
9 CABALLERO, KRISTEL MAE CET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
10 FORONDA, JESUS HOVIE MET TOR NO F137
11 GAMUTAN, JOHN REBREN ECE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
12 GERBOLINGA, JOHN PAUL EET COG
13 GOMEZ, JOHN KING PHILIP CET TOR
14 JARDIN, JOHN KERVEY CPET CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT
15 LANUZO, HONEST SOLEIL CPE COG
16 MANALO, SIMON ADRIAN EET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
17 MANLAPIG, KEN ROBERT ASTRO HD/TCG
18 MISAGAL, KEVIN EET TOR/DIP NO F137
19 MORTA, ALFRED BERYL EET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
20 NALDA, DANIEL JEWEL ECE COG
21 OBUSAN, JOSHUA EET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO OTR
22 PILLAS, KIM JUSTIN ICT HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
23 QUIAP, ANNA PATRICIA CPE TOR
24 RAMOS, LEO CRIS ECE COG
25 RAQUIDAN, ROMMEL CPET CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIP
26 SALE, MANILYN ARCHI HD/TCG
27 SANTOS, GEBBIE ECE COG
28 SINANGOTE, DARWIN EET HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
29 SORIANO, ERICA ECE TOR
30 TABIOLA, MAUMAR ECE TOR
31 TRONO, MICO BOY CPE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
32 VILLALVA, SHELANIE IT COG
VILLOTE, JAYSON ICET TOR NO F137
CBET 1 BUCCAT JR., FERNANDO HRM HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
2 BUSTILLO, MARRA RINA MGMT HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
3 CALAYCAY, BENHUR HRM VERIFICATION FOR WHITE SHIELD
4 DE GUZMAN, JOHN PATRICK ENTRE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
5 DOMINGO, TONI KESE ACCOUNTANCY VERIFICATION FOR MAQ
6 GONGORA JR., BENITO FINANCIAL HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
7 NUNAG, RONALD ALLAN MKTG VERIFICATION FOR SECURITY BANK
8 PEREZ JR., MANUEL MKTG. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
9 SANIEL, ARNOLD OPS. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
10 TUAZON, CHERMAINE OPS. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
12/1/2015
CBET 1 BENDOL, AIZA MGMT. TOR NO F137
2 DARAPIZA, LORENCE JAY ENTRE’L HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
3 FEOLO, JOEMARIE ACCTG. CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLASHIP
4 HOSTALLERO, ADELYN MKTG HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
5 TAUPA, JANE MARIE MGMT. VERIFICATION FOR SM
12/2/2015
CAS/CED 1 BEODIQUE, AUBREY LAURETTE CED HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
 /IPE/GS 2 CANINDO, LUZMARIE CAS CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIP
 /CON 3 CASURAO, MARIVIC CED HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
4 CHAN, AUGUSTUS IPE TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT
5 ERABON, ARLENE CED TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT
6 FLORDE, JUSTIN CAS HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
7 GALAPON, ORLANDO GS TOR FOR PROMOTION
8 KADILE, NENNESSY CED TOR FOR FURTHER STUDY
9 MATUS, IANA KRISTINE CED TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
10 ROBLES, NIÑO CAS TOR FOR EXAMINATION
11 SEGUERRA, RIZA CED HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
12 TOCHE, ROLAN GS TCG FOR SCHOLARSHIP
13 VISPERAS, STEPHANIE CAS CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIP
14 VISTRO, MARY GRACE CED TOR FOR FURTHER STUDY
15
CBET 16 BENDOL, AIZA MGMT TOR FOR GRADUATE
17 DARAPIZA, LORENCE JAY ENTRE HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
18 HOSTALLERO, ADELYN MKTG. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
19 LEAÑO, SHIELA MAE OM CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOALRSHIP
20 NOLLORA, MARIA CARMELA BSA CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOALRSHIP
21 SABANGAN, ZEDRICK BSA CERTIFICATE OF ENROLLMENT FOR SCHOALRSHIP
22 TAUOA, JANE MARIE MGMT VERIFICATION FOR SM STORE
23 UNCIANO, CARYL MKTG. MGMT. CERTIFICATE OF GWA FOR SCHOALRSHIP
12/3/2015
CBET 1 ABEJERO, CHRISTINE MARIE BSA HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
2 ADAYA, ALYSSA OPS. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
3 BATHAN, RODEL ENTREL TOR FOR EMPLOYMENT
4 CASTRO, KEN CALVIEN MGMT VERIFICATION FOR D&B
5 FEOLA, JOEMARIE BSA CERTIFICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIP
6 GARCIA, SHARLYN BSA VERIFICATION FOR D&B
7 LAPIERRE, JOSEPHINE MGMT VERIFICATION FOR VANGUARD
8 MENZONES, ELVIE JUNIOR SECRETRIAL TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ ENTRUST TO THE BEARER
9 PALISOC, JOSHUA ACCTG. TECH. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
10 PARUNGAO, MEL-ANN OM TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL
11 ROCERO, KYLA MGMT HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER
12 RONDUEN, KELVIN LYOD MKTG TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ NO F137
13 SIRENAS, KIANA MICHELLE FIN. MGMT. HD/TCG FOR TRANSFER/ NO F137
14 TALA, QUENCESS BSAT TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ ENTRUST TO THE BEARER
15 VILLA, MA, LOUELLA FATIMA BSAT TOR COPY FOR SCHOOL/ ENTRUST TO THE BEARER

Keynote Speech at the YMCA National Congress of College Students, November 29, 2015, Benitez Hall, Teachers’ Camp, Baguio City, Part II

Posted on December 4, 2016

The EDSA Revolution, on the other hand, was an alliance of incongruent elements.  Led by the Roman Catholic Church, the elite, the military and the Left, it used the masses to achieve its goals of gaining power.  This alliance would break down as soon as those goals have been achieved as we have seen in history. Coup d’etats followed as soon as President Cory Aquino was catapulted to power. The NPA was stronger than ever, the masses were conveniently left out of the picture while the elite, the ruling families, the political dynasties, and the oligarchs were back in the seat of power.

When I was your age, there were no cell phones and computers were still very much at the developmental stages with a whopping memory of about

100 kilobytes. Thus we did not text, and there was no Internet yet and certainly no Facebook and other forms of social media.  This probably made us more responsible. The social media is transforming the values of our youth.  Why have many people become rude, ruthless, arrogant, angry, domineering, cold­blooded, cruel and even inhuman in the social media?  It is because they can hide behind the cloak of anonymity and escape accountability for their actions and words.  They have become irresponsible. Plato many centuries ago called this the syndrome of the Ring of Gyges.

Suppose now that there were two such magic rings, and the just put on one of them and the unjust the other; no man can be imagined to be of such an iron nature that he would stand fast in justice. No man would keep his hands off what was not his own when he could safely take what he liked out of the market, or go into houses and lie with any one at his pleasure, or kill or release from prison whom he would, and in all respects be like a god among men. Then the actions of the just would be as the actions of the unjust; they would both come at last to the same point. And this we may truly affirm to be a great proof that a man is just, not willingly or because he thinks that justice is any good to him individually, but of necessity, for wherever any one thinks that he can safely be unjust, there he is unjust.

For all men believe in their hearts that injustice is far more profitable to the individual than justice, and he who argues as I have been supposing, will say that they are right. If you could imagine any one obtaining this power of becoming invisible, and never doing any wrong or touching what was another’s, he would be thought by the lookers­on to be a most wretched idiot, although they would praise him to one another’s faces, and keep up appearances with one another from a fear that they too might suffer injustice.

Through the social media we gain power without accountability, thus we are liable to use such power unjustly. The natural tendency of humans to see the negative in things becomes heightened by social media.  People and organizations become mired in a culture of negativism.  Their delight is the misfortune, shortcomings, or mistakes of others.  As Joel Villaseca sums it up in his article Culture of Negativism (Inquirer, July 31, 2015)

I’VE HEARD a number of people, mostly fellow Filipinos, assert that we have a culture of negativism. They say we Filipinos seem to have a special talent for homing in on the bad news, on other people’s foibles, especially those in the government and those seeking to run it. With one unfortunate comment, we pounce, and pounce hard, judging that person as if his or her entire being were contained in that one unfortunate comment (or two), disregarding the totality of his or her life, the things done, the choices made, however honorable, however worthy of praise.

Do not be sucked into a culture of negativism.  Avoid negative people, those who see nothing good in the world, those who do not appreciate a fine day, the warm breeze, the goodness of heart of a companion, or even the good things that your schools are doing for you.  Spend two hours with negative people and you become converted. You become negative people yourselves. Spend time with positive people and the same thing happens.  You become positive yourselves. Believe me, there are a lot of things to be thankful for in this life, even during the most trying of times, even during the period of our greatest challenges. I am not saying that you should be positive at all times.  Being negative is part of our instinct of survival, an alarm that goes off whenever something is going wrong, but as Cat Stevens (now Yusuf Islam) says in his song Morning Has Broken,

Morning has broken like the first morning,

Blackbird has spoken like the first bird. Praise for the singing,

Praise for the morning,

Praise for them springing fresh from the world.

In 1976 and 1977 we were old enough back then to understand the major issues affecting our society and mankind in general (with no offense meant for the LGBT community). We sang John Lennon’s Imagine, a song that sought a socialistic utopian form of society.  “Imagine there’s no countries…Imagine there’s no heaven, Imagine no religion…Imagine no possessions”…these are all to be found in Leninist and Maoist ideologies not to mention the song’s atheistic intentions.  We sang them anyway.

We were old enough to sing some of the songs in the Woodstock concert and had some hints on the connection between drugs and sex and revolutions, but it was Martial Law in the Philippines and our very own drug addicts had to content themselves with Mercodol and Corex cough syrups.  Marijuana was expensive and hard to find, but we had our own brand of nationalistic songs which brought to the airwaves the longing of the youth for relevance and meaning to their lives.

Thus, we sang the songs of the Juan Dela Cruz band.  I had some favorite myself such as Inday, Beep beep, Pinoy Blues (“Pinoy na walang wala at tumatanda…bakit ayaw mong tulungan ang batang nahihirapan…”)Titser’s Enemy Number 1, Langit.

We found meaning in our lives with the songs of Sampaguita, Heber Bartolome, Florante, and of course, Freddie Aguilar.  We knew that we were part of society with all its ills. We were old enough to sing some of the selections in Jesus Christ Superstar, and my own favorite is from the mouth of Jesus Christ himself in retort to Judas’ advocacy that Mary of Magdala should not waste the expensive perfume and ointment on Jesus’ feet and hair and instead sell them and give them to the poor.  Jesus shot back at him: “Surely you’re not saying we have the resources to save the poor from their lot?  There will be poor always, pathetically struggling look at the good things you’ve got!”

Of course we do not have the resources to save the poor from their lot.  Not even the government can save the poor from their lot.  But in our own ways perhaps we can help to change the world.  Maybe not in the radical transformation of the social order Marcos envisioned, but maybe we can begin our efforts for change in our own schools.

When I was a student leader like you I was lucky to have fought a good fight, and not as a varsity player in basketball either.  Our school, the Rizal Technological Colleges, was about to be phased out, and as student leader I took the lead in its preservation. We won this one fight, and the RizalTech is now one of the leading State Universities in the country.  I have known academic battles in and out of my University for 40 years.  My advice is choose your battles well.

Choose your battles well. It is not wise to go against your school administration just because you think that it is your traditional role to do so and especially if there is no compelling reason to do so.  Certainly, it is not wise to change the school rules which have been in effect in your schools even before you were born! Rules on hairstyles or dress codes are put in place to help you secure a bright future for yourselves. You knew those rules even before you enrolled but still you enrolled.

You may want to dwell on that issue pertaining to student rights, an issue that pervaded the academic atmosphere in the 1980s.  My own doctoral dissertation, a 600­page paper was written and defended in 1986 just a few days after the EDSA Revolution. This work has given me a deep understanding of the subject but more than anything else it is the right of all students to quality education that matters.  It is a right that must be pursued relentlessly by school administrators, by all teachers and professors, and most importantly, by the students themselves.  It is a

student right above all other student rights.  You can start as soon as you go back to your respective schools by studying hard.  All the things you will do today and in the following days will add up to how your future will look like. A day wasted will be a day deducted from your bright future.

Choose your battles well. It is not being a puppet of the school administration if you cooperate in the cleanliness campaigns of your school, or in recycling, or in its extension projects that would give the people in the community better lives. Reduction of plastics, reduction of garbage, teaching your fellow students to be more responsible, Clean As You Go projects, are good projects because you do battle for the environment, and I tell you these are not easy things to do. Helping your school in literacy campaigns, livelihood campaigns, give meaning to your lives.  You may work on that urban agriculture project and share what you have discovered to the community.

A nice project would be to actively solicit scholarships or sponsorships from business leaders in your community. If all student organizations in your school would be able to get one or two scholarships that could be substantial and you are going to positively affect the lives of many people.

You may engage in sports activities among the members of your organizations, or maybe a triple tournament.  Perhaps this time it would be a basketball tournament, and the next would be badminton.  Keep on playing.

A nice project would be a system of mentoring the lower years by the higher years to help them with their difficulties.

Choose your battles well. Now you may sometimes dislike your teachers, or the system of discipline in your schools, but if the school administration is doing heartfelt improvements in your school despite limitations in funds or despite governmental regulations you should appreciate it.  Studying in a university is like finding a new home you will call your own for the next four or five years. Better be in good terms with the people there.  And instead of hate, be motivated by love instead.

Love gives meaning to your life. You can share your dreams if you love.

You have a good reason to live if you love.  Charles Dickens summed this up perfectly in his novel A Christmas Carol, one of my favorite reads.  He said “No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of another.”

Good morning.

Categories: President's Corner

Keynote Speech at the YMCA National Congress of College Students, November 29, 2015, Benitez Hall, Teachers’ Camp, Baguio City – Part I

Posted on December 2, 2015

The theme for this year’s Congress is “Spirit of the Y’er: Networking through Engagement to Become Responsible and Good Youth”.  I think this is a very timely theme.  Our youth today have become so distracted by so many things that they are missing many of the good things in life.

In 1976, thirty nine years ago, I was a delegate like you.  I represented the Rizal Technological Colleges together with nine other students.

The issues we discussed that year, the 2nd National Congress of College Students, were about how the youth could help in nation-building in general and how we could directly participate in community activities that would benefit the youth and the people in the community.  Like what you will be doing in this year’s Congress (the 4oth! Can you believe it!) we drafted resolutions per Commission and presented them in the Plenary Session.  I remember proposing the most number of resolutions to our Commission and I was asked by my group to write those resolutions myself with all those whereases, but when it came to the Plenary Session I was banged down by the Congress Chairman for being out of order.  It was embarrassing, but it served as a very good motivation for me to study parliamentary procedure and master it so that by the 3rd Congress in 1977 (I was sent back by the RTC as delegate) I myself alternated in presiding in the Plenary Session.  It helped a lot that I was the Federation President of the Kabataang Barangay of Pasig. We had epic national congresses with all the provincial and city KB presidents, possibly the best young minds in the country at the time, and the debates were done through parliamentary procedure.

What were our issues then?  In 1976 and 1977 the country was still deep in Martial Law.  The Kabataang Barangay was very active in community affairs.  The KB was the only youth organization that had direct participation in governmental affairs, as well as the only avenue for them to discuss political and social issues.

We avidly read all literature during the Marcos era such as Today’s Revolution: Democracy, Notes on the New Society, Democratic Revolution in the Philippines, Tadhana, and many others.  With my own readings in the works of Tolstoy, Marx, Mao’s Red Book, Mein Kampf, and other political and literary works, a synthesis of ideas would be inevitable.

We learned that Communism is a foreign ideology which was not suited for Filipinos what with our highly paternalistic society.  Marxism, which is born out of the industrial conflicts in Europe, cannot be made to grow and prosper in an agricultural society, except if it would mutate into the communist brand of Mao Tse Tung.

But even that brand of Communism wrought havoc on Chinese society, causing the death, directly or indirectly, of more than 60 million Chinese.  While giving Communism the benefit of the doubt, Marcos was right in concluding that Communism was not and could never be Democracy despite Communism’s claim that she is the highest form of Democracy. According to Marcos,

I can see and appreciate the social and economic good of communism. But I find it difficult to understand how its political society can be called democratic when a single party, the Communist party, or a group of men who control it, has a monopoly of political power. ‘The party knows best,’ is the simplified dictum of the communist political order.

Marcos had plans for the nation.  As I have over the decades analyzed what happened and what could have happened if Marcos lived a little longer and if the EDSA Revolution did not happen, the country could have politically matured soon enough.  Marcos’ Democratic Revolution is a revolution that advocated massive change, but such change would be initiated by the State itself, as Marcos explains himself:

We have characterized the democratic revolution as ‘revolution from the center,’ because it is a revolution initiated by the government, which stands at the center of society and not above the people. Ours is a revolution neither from the left nor the right, neither from above nor below: but a revolution or, better still, a radicalization of existing social arrangements, initiated not simply by a duly constituted authority but by the only authority morally bound to act in behalf of the people.

The EDSA Revolution, on the other hand, was an alliance of incongruent elements.  Led by the Roman Catholic Church, the elite, the military and the Left, it used the masses to achieve its goals of gaining power.  This alliance would break down as soon as those goals have been achieved as we have seen in history.  Coup d’etats followed as soon as President Cory Aquino was catapulted to power.  The NPA was stronger than ever, the masses were conveniently left out of the picture while the elite, the ruling families, the political dynasties, and the oligarchs were back in the seat of power.  Even schools were not spared by the resulting chaos.  School administrators, the RTU included, all but abdicated from their duty to keep order and discipline in the campus, which broke down very quickly and took many years to restore.

When I was your age, there were no cell phones and computers were still very much at the developmental stages with a whopping memory of about 100 kilobytes.  Thus we did not text, and there was no Internet yet and certainly no Facebook and other forms of social media.  This probably made us more responsible.  The social media is transforming the values of our youth.  Why have many people become rude, ruthless, arrogant, angry, domineering, cold-blooded, cruel and even inhuman in the social media?  It is because they can hide behind the cloak of anonymity and escape accountability for their actions and words.  They have become irresponsible.  Plato many centuries ago called this the syndrome of the Ring of Gyges.  According to Plato,

Suppose now that there were two such magic rings, and the just put on one of them and the unjust the other; no man can be imagined to be of such an iron nature that he would stand fast in justice. No man would keep his hands off what was not his own when he could safely take what he liked out of the market, or go into houses and lie with any one at his pleasure, or kill or release from prison whom he would, and in all respects be like a god among men.

Then the actions of the just would be as the actions of the unjust; they would both come at last to the same point. And this we may truly affirm to be a great proof that a man is just, not willingly or because he thinks that justice is any good to him individually, but of necessity, for wherever any one thinks that he can safely be unjust, there he is unjust.

For all men believe in their hearts that injustice is far more profitable to the individual than justice, and he who argues as I have been supposing, will say that they are right. If you could imagine any one obtaining this power of becoming invisible, and never doing any wrong or touching what was another’s, he would be thought by the lookers-on to be a most wretched idiot, although they would praise him to one another’s faces, and keep up appearances with one another from a fear that they too might suffer injustice.

Categories: President's Corner